Beaches on Siesta Key

Siesta Beach

Crescent Beach

Crescent Beach

Named the #1 beach in America numerous times over the years by Dr. Beach, Trip Advisor, Travel Channel, and more.  Siesta Beach's world famous powdery white sand is composed of nearly 100% quartz crystal, hundreds of yards wide.  Recent improvements afford visitors extensive paved parking, two large pavilions with concessions and restrooms, equipment sales/rentals, mini pavilions of various sizes, various food trucks, a playground, tennis courts, and a newly installed track for easy wheelchair access. 

Crescent Beach

Crescent Beach

Crescent Beach

Beginning at the main public beach and running south to Point of Rocks, Crescent Beach is crescent shaped slice of powdery crystal white sand, consistently named among the best beaches in the world for over a decade.  The beach is wide and the entrance into the water is on a very gradual slope.  Accessible at the various beach access points with limited parking at each.  No lifeguards or public facilities. 

Point of Rocks

Crescent Beach

Turtle Beach​​​

Quiet and small with not direct parking available, Point of Rocks is at the very end of Crescent Beach.  Because of the point and the rocks, it's a great snorkeling spot.  You can get there by walking from one of the southernmost Crescent Beach access points - or find a friend that lives in the neighborhood.  Also a great spot for a family photo shoot! 

Turtle Beach​​​

Palmer Point Beach

Turtle Beach​​​

Whether you're looking for a quiet day at the beach or want to bring your tent or camper and stay at the camp grounds for a few days, you'll love the privacy, volleyball court, playground and horseshoe pit.  (Reservations are a must at the campground.)  Periodic beach re-nourishment makes the sand courser than the other Siesta Beaches and the drop-off into the water is much steeper.

Palmer Point Beach

Palmer Point Beach

Palmer Point Beach

 Running from the southern tip of Siesta Key to the northern tip of Casey Key, Palmer Point Beach is only accessible on foot or by boat.  It offers privacy, but no lifeguards or facilities.  You'll often find kayaks and boats "beached" here.  Serious walkers can complete the 8-mile journey from Turtle Beach to the southern end of Casey Key.